Plate of fish dating

They were soon being cooked much the same way as their smaller European counterparts, in sauces for other fish, or as accompaniments to roasts...When not potting lobsters, baking them in pies or using them in sauces, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century New England cooks were apt to stew or fricassee them...The were highly esteemed by the British, not so esteemed by American colonists.This sea creature enjoyed a resurgence of demand in the 19th century which still holds true today. Its most noticeable external traits were its long hands and small feet' (Archestratus), its bent fingers (Epicharmus) and its dark color (Pliny).By 1885 the American lobster industry was providing 130 million pounds of lobster per year.So afterward the population of the lobster beds decreased rapidly, and by 1918 only 33 million pounds were taken." ---Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, John F. 186) [NOTE: This book has separate entries for selected popular dishes: Lobster rolls, lobster Newburg, lobster a l'americaine, and lobster fra diavolo.

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In the 1840s, [Catharine] Beecher...presented boiled lobster served in this fashion... When nineteeth-century canning methods, developed around 1840 and perfected during the Civil War, were redirected toward peacetime activities, lobsters were among the most popular canned products.

If you need these ask your librarain to help you find a copy.] "In 1621 Edward Winslow reported to a friend back in England concerning the Plymouth settlement that "our Bay is full of Lobsters all the Summer." In Salem a few years later, Francis Higginson observed that "the least Boy in the Plantation may both catch and eat what he will of" lobters.

Lobsters were not only plentiful in early New England, they were large.

They sometimes washed up on the beaches of Plymouth, Massachusetts, in piles of two feet high.

These settlers approached the creatures with less than gustator enthusiasm, but the lobsters' abundance mande them fit for the tables of the poor...